Graduate School

Lesley Koplow Receives Emily Fenichel Award for Leadership

Posted by Amy Kline on May 28, 2013

Lesley Koplow

Lesley Koplow, Director of the Center for Emotionally Responsive Practice at Bank Street College of Education has been named the recipient of the Emily Fenichel Award for Leadership for 2013.

Established by the New York Zero-to-Three Network in 2007, the award honors the memory of Emily Fenichel, MSW, Associate Director of ZERO TO THREE: The National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, whose work often served to bring the voices of “unsung heroes” in  the  zero-to-three  field  to  the  fore.  Because  many  zero-to- three leaders and professionals work quietly in their schools or organizations without much public acknowledgement, the Emily Fenichel Award is intended to provide an opportunity for their dedication to be recognized.

Lesley Koplow is the former Director of the Karen Horney Clinic Therapeutic Nursery in Manhattan. She is the author of several books including, Bears, Bears Everywhere: Supporting Children’s Emotional Health in the Classroom (Teacher’s College Press, 2008), Unsmiling Faces: How Preschools Can Heal(Teachers College Press, 2007), and Creating Schools That Heal (Teachers College Press, 2002).

As a clinical social worker, teacher and author who lives in New York City, Lesley has devoted her career to finding ways to help young children in need: running daycare centers, authoring books for children, teachers, therapists and the general public. Lesley has sought to increase awareness of the needs of the zero-to-three population, particularly for the neediest of our babies: the homeless, the abused, the drug-exposed. She has carried her mission into public schools offering the creation of classrooms that speak to the emotional needs of children creating a safe place for learning and for healing.

According to her nominator for this award, “Lesley is one of the most remarkably talented clinicians I have ever encountered whose intuitive understanding of children is akin to the great masters like Winnicott and Fraiberg and whose commitment is no less deep. In her [Lesley’s] words: “Deep deprivation in a patient often confronts the therapist with empty spaces in her own person, spaces that have been closed off until a child’s cries echo there. These echoes motivate my writing...” and clearly her [Lesley’s] life.” Congratulations Lesley!