Figure 2: Advantages of Coteaching Models with Class Configurations

Format

Class Configurations

Advantages

One Teach,
One Observe

  • Whole Class
  • Provides a systematic observation/data-collection system
  • Creates the opportunity to switch roles
  • Facilitates individual assistance to students
  • Allows teachers to gauge student engagement and learning
  • Permits teachers to give peer feedback to each other
  • Maximizes opportunities for student learning

One Teach,
One Drift

  • Whole Class
    Individual
  • Guarantees individualized attention for any student
  • Creates the opportunity to switch roles
  • Permits teachers to give feedback to each other
  • Maximizes opportunities for student learning

Station Teaching

  • Small Group
    Individual
  • Provides an active learning format
  • Increases small-group attention
  • Encourages cooperation and interdependence
  • Allows strategic grouping
  • Increases response rate
  • Permits teaching students with different aptitudes and skills
  • Utilizes differentiated instruction
  • May create options for student choice
  • Allows both teachers to be perceived as equal

Parallel Teaching

  • Half Class
    Individual
  • Provides effective review format
  • Encourages student responses
  • Reduces pupil–teacher ratio for group instruction
  • May encourage student competition
  • Can accommodate students’ learning styles and teachers’ teaching styles
  • Allows both teachers to be perceived as equal
  • Allows teachers to immediately check information/content area with each other

Alternative Teaching

  • Small Group and Large Group
    Individual
  • Facilitates enrichment opportunities
  • Offers absent students time to catch up
  • Keeps individuals and class on pace
  • Offers time to develop missing skills
  • Allows for integration of class transfers

Tag Team Teaching

  • Whole Class
    Individual
  • Creates a dynamic classroom
  • Encourages and acknowledges multiple interpretations
  • Provides multiple opportunities for presenting information
  • Models listening, speaking, and working collaboratively in a partnership
  • Encompasses varying approaches

Source: Modified from Cook and Friend (1996)