Figure 3: Examples of IEP Summaries

IEP Summary: Kyoko

Student’s learning profile and areas of strength

  • Strong reading skills
  • Strong visual skills
  • Strengths in active working memory
  • Self-motivated and can complete independent task
  • Enjoys working with partners and small groups

Areas of need

  • Weak auditory processing and therefore missing important information
  • Weak word-finding skills; has a hard time forming language on demand
  • Needs to improve use of “Wh” questions and to check for clarity
  • Needs to expand ideas and topics during writing
  • Needs to self-advocate in group activities and share ideas and thoughts

Strategies that have been successful

  • Word banks and visual verbal prompting
  • Structured partner activities (group jobs and responsibilities)
  • Extra processing time
  • Previewing and priming with visual cue prior to group activities
  • Regular positive feedback specifically in regard to her verbal participation in class
  • Written directions for a tasks so she can self-correct
  • Graphic organizers with visual cues when necessary

Notes

Kyoko is quiet but not shy. She will often initiate a task without checking first to see if she is doing the correct task. She needs to be encouraged to ask for help and to stop and check her work using class visuals and/or peers.

IEP Summary: Jayson

Student’s learning profile and areas of strength

  • Diagnosed with ADHD
  • Learns best with tactile and kinesthetic activities
  • Strong math skills
  • Decoding on grade level
  • Has a lot of ideas for writing projects
  • Enjoys working with partners

Areas of need

  • Struggling with inference in reading
  • Needs to improve independent reading and stamina; currently reading for approximately five minutes independently
  • Struggles with organization of materials
  • Can have a low frustration level for difficult tasks
  • Needs to improve conflict resolution skills
  • Struggling with independently managing multistep tasks

Strategies that have been successful

  • Breaking schedule for self-regulation and movement
  • Seating options
  • Hands-on multisensory materials for minilessons
  • Clear positive feedback after completion of tasks
  • Written directions for all tasks
  • Graphic organizers with tasks broken down

Notes

Jayson enjoys academics and has a lot of great ideas to share. He really likes working with his friends. When he gets frustrated or over stimulated it is a good idea to remind him to take a break

IEP Summary: Trevor

Student’s learning profile and areas of strength

  • Diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome
  • Learns best with visual concrete presentation of materials
  • Decoding above grade level, comprehension on grade level
  • Good writing skills
  • Enjoys participating in group discussions, especially in social studies
  • Enjoys working with his friends and familiar peers

Areas of need

  • Beginning to struggle with inference in reading; can miss important information
  • Needs to improve independent reading and stamina; can lose focus and engage in     self-stimulatory behavior after approximately eight minutes
  • Struggles with organization of materials and finishing tasks on time
  • Can become very upset when transitioning, especially when ending preferred tasks     and when the transition is unplanned or unexpected
  • Needs to improve conversation skills with peers

Strategies that have been successful

  • Break option for self-regulation, calming down, and sensory integration
  • Visual cues for abstract concepts (these should be embedded in whole class visual     charts)
  • Individual daily schedule with specific new information about the day
  • Written directions for all tasks
  • Graphic organizers with visual cues

Notes

Trevor’s independent work skills have improved a lot lately. He has mastered the use of his writing folder and the graphic organizers. This has greatly improved his ability to write independently and get all his ideas on paper. He can independently decide when he needs a break, and when the break is over he is rejoining the group activity. His next step is to be able to rejoin the group quietly and get right to work.